Animal Crossing's real currency transactions may not last long

  • Nintendo may be preparing to crack down on the aggressive players who sell animals through real-life money: New Horizons villagers.

    Nintendo seems to have turned its attention to Animal Crossing: New Horizons players: Players have replaced Animal Crossing Bells, Animal Crossing Nook miles Ticket and villagers with real money in the game, and this money may not stay for long. For all to see, New Horizons is arguably the most successful game in the Animal Crossing series, and this success has spawned many weird and surprising ways that contradict the game and its systems, but many of these are ways that Nintendo does not agreed.

    Animal crossing: The success of New Horizons is attributed to the villagers. Since the first game in the Animal Crossing series, villagers have been the backbone of the game’s formula, which is the main reason why the series is so successful. These cute and adorable animal people give the series a unique identity. Although some villagers are more favored than others, some villagers are completely hated. It is safe to say that without them, the franchise will not be so successful.

    However, some villagers may be too favored. Some villagers, including the sheep dom (Dom), were sold at a real price close to fifty dollars. The wild reputation of the infamous cat Raymond has led to a truly quirky pseudo-economy that can be sold at up to 1,500,000 Animal Crossing Bells in games or at a real price of nearly $75 obtain. According to Kotaku's report, Nintendo clearly prohibits these actual real-world transactions, and Nintendo only allows monetization of game video recordings through our game channel and similar efforts. Japanese news site J-Cast contacted Nintendo to understand its views on the matter. Nintendo replied that it is aware of these violations and is currently studying what measures should be taken to mitigate these violations.

    Developers have been working on bugs that allow players to copy items and crack additional copies of a given villager. Nintendo has also begun ordering its popular Amiibo cards to prevent them from quickly selling out and being redistributed by the scalpers. The company obviously doesn't like their delightful, relaxed games as the background of a brutal black market.

    It is easy to understand Nintendo's point of view here. "Animal Crossing: New Horizons" is a fairly clear child-friendly casual game, and illegal and very expensive transactions conducted in this atmosphere may have a terrible impact. Frankly speaking, anyone who Buy Nook miles Ticket and Animal Crossing Bells for $50 enjoys the privilege of living with digital animals, no matter how cute they are, it is unhealthy.


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